Gamin du Tokyo

Last night we were invited to a restaurant, a charming place, casual cuisine, something you can eat everyday. The restaurant is small and consists of a the top floor and a bottom floor. The chef, a young man in his early forties, created an atmosphere where you can enjoy, French, Italian or inspired Japanese cuisine served at a counter. Each space is identified by its own charm.

The mood upstairs is focused on the open kitchen, the chef works hard and his brigade of two, move around at a lightening speed. The kitchen itself is designed by the chef who trained in France. His menu is principally designed around French cuisine, the foods are various, a long menu gets translated to us by the waiter.

We decided to share an omlette, a signature dish of the chef. He whips egg whites separately, takes in another bowl some whole eggs, cream and parmesan and combines the two when ready. He then unfolds the combined liquid across his hot griddle and rolls it. The end result a perfect omlette, fluffy and topped with honey and a few slices of black truffle.

What is most extraordinary, puzzling if you would, is the griddle in the kitchen. I have not seen in a French restaurant, or a French chef cooking on a griddle. It is uncommon for a chef to use a single cooking surface for almost everything. We debated it amongst ourselves until it was suggested to ask. The chef was anxious to show us, we walked into the kitchen and he explained.

The kitchen is small, movements are limited and the single surface permits him easy to manage cooking station. He wipes it clean as often as he needs and there is no mess created. A very cleaver idea for a kitchen but it takes some changing of your mind to get into that head space. [Bravo]

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Categories: Kitchen Facts, Life Cycles