Bees Wax @ Steirereck |Heinz Reitbauer|

The relationship between bees and humans dates to the hunter-gatherer days when armed with nothing except a long stick, men would knock down hives from trees and run. Returning to the scene to harvest the honey when it was deemed safe honey was harvested.

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There are cave paintings in Valencia Spain dating back about 8,000 years that show two people collecting honey and honeycomb from a wild bee hive.

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Ancient Egyptians valued beeswax in mummification and used it for the embalming process. They also used wax to seal the coffin and make it air tight, further preserving the body.

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They even recognized the importance of beeswax in health, as prescriptions dating back to 1550 B.C. called for beeswax in various formulations, as did the Chinese.

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Two years ago chef Reitbauer developed a new method of cooking which has caused considerable interest in professional circles. The idea of cooking using organic beeswax heated to 84°C and poured over grayling fillet to watch it after a short time the wax sets and a perfectly cooked fish!

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He also uses wax to preserve foods and even clarify stock, reusing wax several times until it loses its character. The melting point is 61°C and when you heat it over 90°C it loses aroma. But Reitbauer’s goal is to flavor the stock and his beeswax-based dishes with that seasonal je ne sais quoi only bees can deliver.

This is simply genius and what a tremendous idea, simple yet so precise. My photos do not do it justice but until next time when I return to Vienna.

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Am Heumarkt 2A, 1030 Wien, Austria
T. +43 1 7133168

source: Internet